intfiction.org

The Interactive Fiction Community Forum
It is currently Sat Aug 18, 2018 3:38 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 18 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon May 11, 2015 10:50 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 04, 2010 4:44 pm
Posts: 148
Howdy y’all,

Has our community, or a community closely aligned with ours, put forth any effort to survey, test and (if necessary) improve the current state of browser-based IF when it comes to accessibility? I mean this in the sense of providing affordances to assist those with disabilities in playing the text games we love.

During last fall’s IFComp, I corresponded at length with a blind player who expressed disappointment that the only competition entries they could play using their computer’s braille output device were downloaded Z-code games. While they could browse websites just fine, they found that web-based IF games of any sort invariably stumped their machine, leaving the games unplayable. At the same time, I also engaged in a brief conversation or two on Twitter involving other players asking about accessibility, particularly of the Twine-based entries. I’m sorry to say that neither I nor anyone else on the “IF expert” side could offer any definitive answers.

But this isn’t just about Twine, nor is this just about vision-impaired players. Almost every new work of non-commercial IF produced today — whether parser, hypertext, or something else — is either web-exclusive, or can be played through a web-based interpreter. And that’s great, in part because there today exists a wealth of well-developed technologies, techniques, and standards to help make web-based software accessible to as wide an audience as possible. (I was, for example, very happy to hear from my interlocutor that the ifcomp.org website worked great on their braille browser. I give full credit here to the site’s underlying Bootstrap framework, which provides a lot of accessibility magic for free.)

I do not at this time know, however, whether or how well we the creators and maintainers of IF web software have basked accessibility into our designs. This isn’t a rhetorical question — I really don’t know the answer! I’d love someone to tell me that one or more popular engines or interpreters has accessibility (or “a11y”, as the Twitterati call it) in mind. For popular web-based IF platforms not on such a list, though, I’d like to ask what we can do to start improving them in this regard.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2015 12:15 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Apr 18, 2010 3:58 pm
Posts: 811
jmac wrote:
During last fall’s IFComp, I corresponded at length with a blind player who expressed disappointment that the only competition entries they could play using their computer’s braille output device were downloaded Z-code games.


That's odd. Creatures Such as We should have worked just fine; lots of visually impaired users play ChoiceScript games and we've heard that they work.

_________________
At Choice of Games, we sell long-form choice-based interactive fiction games. We're looking for writers, paid in advance.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2015 5:19 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 12, 2014 7:56 pm
Posts: 1668
Wade Clark has posted in his blog about his experience with making Leadlight accessible, and raising awareness of a few issues some people (i.e., me) might not otherwise have known about.

http://importantastrolab.blogspot.pt/20 ... art-1.html


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2015 8:11 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 04, 2010 4:44 pm
Posts: 148
dfabulich wrote:
That's odd. Creatures Such as We should have worked just fine; lots of visually impaired users play ChoiceScript games and we've heard that they work.


I'm happy to hear that about ChoiceScript!

As for this person, I don't know at this time if they methodically tried every entry that wasn't z-code, or if they looked at a few, had no luck, and gave up. It's entirely possible that the two ChoiceScript entries would have worked fine.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2015 10:43 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2012 9:21 am
Posts: 292
It may be that it will be up to us who use alternate means of playing the games to let game and system creators know of any problems and offer our testing services. I'm willing to test anything for accessibility, but I might represent just a small proportion of these individuals, those who use a screen reader (and only one brand). I don't use braille outputs.

I talked about accessibility issues in a previous thread. Maybe I'll summarize my experiences and put them on my website. It is getting harder to play games as game creators experiment with different tools. Adding music, for example, can drown out screen readers. Relying on colored text or other text effects can be a problem. Webpages with a lot of input fields, drop-down boxes, JavaScript, or graphics can be tricky to navigate. And then some browsers are more accessible than others. I recommend anyone who uses a screen reader to use Firefox for hypertext games.

Neil


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2015 11:05 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Dec 25, 2007 10:06 am
Posts: 1530
Coincidentally, I've recently been adding screenreader support to an unrelated web app with similar properties. It seems that adding aria-live="assertive" property to Parchment's main element makes it work somewhat better, at least in OS X's Voiceover. It reads responses to commands (which it didn't do before) but the problem is that sometimes you have to reload the page a couple of times to get it read more than just the first line from the initial output.

Could someone with other screenreaders or braille displays confirm that it works, and if it has a similar problem with the initial screen? I've uploaded it here: http://nitku.net/if/parchment/ If it works for people I can make a pull request to the official version.

_________________
BlogTextureVorple


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2015 12:28 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Feb 11, 2010 1:51 pm
Posts: 797
Location: Geneva, Illinois, USA
Note to self: Add 'accessibility' to requirements in quixe-channels.

--dc


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2015 1:01 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2012 9:21 am
Posts: 292
This is a great improvement for Firefox and Chrome with the JAWS screen reader for Windows 7. In Internet Explorer, it reads the previous 1-3 commands, then everything (or just what's on the screen?), then reads it again. Still, I think this is better because I can stop the reader from reading the text anytime. Maybe on the website you should recommend Firefox?

Thanks for considering this issue. I would use Parchment more (i.e., play more games online) with the update. Right now, offline interpreters are a little easier to use.

Neil


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2015 1:35 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue May 04, 2010 8:19 pm
Posts: 143
This topic has been on my mind lately. Specifically, I've been wondering what can be done on the library-side of things to make games work better with screenreaders. I even recently wrote to the audyssey mailing list, but I don't think I did it correctly so I'm not sure it went through.

Questions I have: could status lines be handled better? Ideally, in screenreader mode, should they be drawn or ignored completely? Should their info be written in the main window? Do visually impaired users use BRIEF and SUPERBRIEF modes more often than the rest of us? Are there other improvements people can imagine?

Roodylib combined with my menu extension for Hugo already has support for drawing all menus as numbered lists if in the correct mode, but I'm curious what else can be done in this area.

EDIT: Oh yeah, I also was curious which offline interpreters were most popular with visually impaired users.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2015 2:01 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Feb 11, 2010 1:51 pm
Posts: 797
Location: Geneva, Illinois, USA
I would think a specific theme for accessibility would be best. Only the main story text would be displayed, with possibly a list of links that had common commands; directions, inventory, score, time, turn. I could even see writing a new command 'status' for all of the status line information, plus inventory and directions.

Start of Example.

This is Zork 1, The Great Underground Empire by Infocom.

You are standing in an open field west of a white house, with a boarded front door.

There is a small mailbox here.

> STATUS
You are in the location "West of House". As of turn 0, your score is 0. You are empty-handed. You are in perfect health. You can be killed by a serious wound.

> LOOK
You are standing in an open field west of a white house, with a boarded front door.

End of Example.

David C.
http://plover.net/~dave/blog/


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 18 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group